Posts Tagged Starcraft II

The Nitpixels Podcast Episode 15: When censors attack

The Nitpixels Podcast returns this week with your hosts Alex Ziebart, Matthew Rossi, and Mat McCurley. We’re late yet again this week due to that crazy Independence Day thing.

This week’s discussion topics include:

You can listen to the podcast in the embedded player below, download it directly via the link below, or download and subscribe via iTunesNote: The iTunes store can take an extraordinarily long time to display new episodes on the podcast page. If you subscribe, it will download the episode for you, even though it may not immediately display on the page.

Do you have a question you would like to ask the Nitpixels crew? Have comments about the podcast? Email us at mailbag@nitpixels.com and we’ll answer it on the next edition of the Nitpixels Show if it strikes our fancy. You can also tweet any of us your questions — you can find our Twitter handles on the right-hand side of this very page (unless you’re on our mobile site).

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The Soundtrack


Frankly, a well scored game with a sophisticated soundtrack is infinitely better. Take the exact same game and replace the soundtrack with something inferior, some mix tape you have laying around, and you’ll see a difference immediately. Play the game with the sound off and take note. It really doesn’t matter what genre, the addition of a thematic score works to evoke whatever emotional content the game is attempting to create.  Some games, like EVE Online, put their soundtracks online for you to listen to them. Others can be purchased from iTunes or elsewhere.

I’m not exaggerating when I say that Jack Wall is one of my favorite musicians, or that Russell Brower is the reason I enjoyed Starcraft II. (I’m not a big RTS player.) Quite frankly I believe the games industry is overtaking Hollywood as the home for talented composers to come and realize a symphonic musical vision. Games seem to require more orchestration, You can go back and listen to games that came out in the late 90’s and hear it. You can listen to Dead Space 2, or Halo Reach and see the unification of music with setting. The game design takes music and ambiance into account, and when done right, it’s unforgettable.

This leads me to wonder what you, the reader (yeah, you, guy with the towel on your head, I even mean you) would nominate as the best game soundtracks. I have my own votes, but I’ll leave that for a future post. For now, what game music made its way onto your MP3 player? What do you find yourself listening to outside the games you discovered it in?

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